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Removing Corroded Parts
By John A. Tuttle

Hi All,  Over the years I've had numerous occasions to remove corroded
parts from a variety of devices.  Across the board, I've found that the
most effective technique involves forcing the part to go further "in"
before attempting to take it "out".

I realize that that might sound a little vague, so I'll explain.  With
anything that is corroded, the corrosion is typically above, or on the
outside side of the object.  What is on the underside is usually in
pretty good shape.  The point is that the corrosion will usually break
easier if the object is forced in the direction of least resistance.

Mouse urine, being an acid, typically corrodes things from the outside
to the inside, not the other way around.  So forcing the reed to go
ever so slightly further "in" may be the easiest way to break the bond
between the wood and the brass without damaging the wood.  I had a
similar experience with key pins that had a massive amount of corrosion
from mouse urine.  When I attempted to pull the pins out directly small
chunks of wood came with the pin.  When I banged the pins in a little
further first, they came out easier, and the wood stayed in place.

Lastly, if there is a chemical that will 'melt' the corrosive bond, it
will most likely contaminate the wood on a permanent basis and leave
behind an odor of its own.

Just my opinion.

Musically,

John A. Tuttle


(Message sent Mon 4 Mar 2002, 13:35:33 GMT, from time zone GMT-0500.)

Key Words in Subject:  Corroded, Parts, Removing

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