Mechanical Music Digest  Archives
You Are Not Logged In Login/Get New Account
Please Log In. Accounts are free!
Logged In users are granted additional features including a more current version of the Archives and a simplified process for submitting articles.
Home Archives Calendar Gallery Store Links Info

Our End-Of-Year Fundraising Drive is in progress. Please visit out home page to see this and other announcements:
https://www.mmdigest.com     Thank you. --Jody

MMD > Archives > April 2007 > 2007.04.23 > 07Prev  Next


Flat Leather Drive Belt for Western Electric
By Ken Vinen

Max, Western Electric was connected with Seeburg.  The drive tire is
available from the Player Piano Company.  If they no longer stock it,
a proper size should be available in the form of an "O" ring from a
good industrial supply house.

Flat leather drive belts can be custom made at any good harness shop,
but be warned, the new leather is not much good for belting and will
stretch way past the adjustment available to you.  This means a good
many trips back to the harness shop to have the belt cut, shortened,
chamfered and reglued and stitched.

The original glue joint on the original belt did hold but again, new
glue and new leather does not make a splice that won't "creep" and come
apart without stitching!

While we all like to keep things original, there are times when
changes must be made to be practical.  My Wurlitzer Band Organ is still
driven with flat belts and I went through endless trouble trying to
use leather as original.  After six trips to the shop for adjustments,
I changed to rubber/fabric belting and now have many years of trouble
free service behind me.

Leather flat belts required some use of belt dressing, which is no
longer available in solid stick form, only a spray can that gets into
everything.  Dressing was required if the cast iron wheels were cold
because the leather would just slip and slide right off the pulley.

Rubber/fabric belting does not stretch, does not need dressing, but
does have a metal splice or metal lace.  It will make an audible tick
that is heard only before the music starts.

The Player Piano Company sells this material but rather than describe
it for drive belting, they suggest it is good to use for replacement
connecting straps on a box pump, which it certainly is.  Because they
only offered one width, perhaps it may be too wide or not wide enough
for your replacement needs.  Proper width is critical because the flat
belt pulley is crowned in the centre to hold the belt in position.
All flat belts, and sanding belts, go to the high spot!

For my needs, I went to the T.S.C. Store (Tractor Supply Company) and
purchased "Baler Belting" long enough for my needs.  It was certainly
way too wide, but I was then able to simply slice off the required
width I needed and my local farm implement dealer was happy to splice
up two belts for me.  Cost of the belting was most reasonable and the
splicing was _free_, after the man stopped laughing at me when I told
him what it was to be used for.  "No, not a thrashing machine --
a band organ!"

Hope this has been of some help.

Best to all in mechanical music,
Ken Vinen, Aylmer, Ontario, Canada


(Message sent Mon 23 Apr 2007, 13:24:09 GMT, from time zone GMT-0400.)

Key Words in Subject:  Belt, Drive, Electric, Flat, Leather, Western

Home    Archives    Calendar    Gallery    Store    Links    Info   


Enter text below to search the MMD Website with Google



CONTACT FORM: Click HERE to write to the editor, or to post a message about Mechanical Musical Instruments to the MMD

Unless otherwise noted, all opinions are those of the individual authors and may not represent those of the editors. Compilation copyright 1995-2018 by Jody Kravitz.

Please read our Republication Policy before copying information from or creating links to this web site.

Click HERE to contact the webmaster regarding problems with the website.

Please support publication of the MMD by donating online

Pay via PayPal

No PayPal account required

                                     
Translate This Page

. .